Localized Convective Lifting

Launch Interactive
Adobe Flash experience. Not recommended for mobile devices.

 

On a warm, sunny day, certain areas of the earth’s surface absorb more heat from the sun than others; as a result, the air near the earth’s surface is heated somewhat unevenly. Air molecules adjacent to these hot surfaces bounce against them thereby gaining some energy by conduction. The heated air expands and becomes less dense than the surrounding cooler air.  The heated air expands and becomes less dense than the surrounding air. The expanded warm air is buoyed upwards and rises. In this manner, the large bubbles of warm air rise and transfer heat energy upward. Cooler, heavier air flows toward the surface to replace the rising air. This cooler air becomes heated in turn, rises, and the cycle is repeated. In meteorology, this vertical exchange of heat is called convection, and the rising bubbles are known as thermals.

  • Client XplorePaks LLC.
  • Date August 14, 2017
  • Tags Illustration, Interactive
  • URL View Project